Definitions of all topics about the regions in The Netherlands.

Definitions of all topics about the regions in The Netherlands.

AllCharts.info offers information on more than 100 data topics for the Netherlands and every province, municipality, borough and neighborhood! The definitions of all topics are described on this page.
AllCharts.info offers information on more than 100 data topics for the Netherlands and every province, municipality, borough and neighborhood! The definitions of all topics are described on this page.
Table with the definitions of all topics:

The table below shows the definitions of all topics that are used at the pages with regional statistics for The Netherlands:

TopicDefinitionCategory
Region codeUnique key for each region.Regional
Region nameName of the region. The municipalities in the Netherlands are divided into boroughs and neighborhoods. Neighborhoods are the lowest regional level. Neighborhoods are sums of one or more contiguous boroughs. The municipality itself determines the division into districts and neighborhoods. The Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS) Netherlands coordinates this classification nationally.Regional
Region typeType of region: Country (land), Province (provincie), Municipality (local authority, gemeente) borough (wijk), neighbourhood (buurt).Regional
InhabitantsNumber of inhabitants, population. The population of the Netherlands on January 1st. The population numbers only include persons who are included in the population register of a Dutch municipality.Population
MenGender: men.Population
WomenGender: women.Population
Ages 0 - 15Age group: Number of residents who are 0 to 15 years old on January 1st.Population
Ages 15 - 25Age group: Number of residents who are 15 to 25 years old on January 1st.Population
Ages 25 - 45Age groups: Number of residents who are 25 to 45 years old on January 1st.Population
Ages 45 - 65Age groups: Number of residents who are 45 to 65 years old on January 1st.Population
Ages 65 and upAge groups: Number of residents who are 65 years or older on January 1st.Population
Not marriedThe number of residents who are unmarried on January 1st. Marital status unmarried indicates that a person has never married or entered into a registered partnership.Population
MarriedThe number of residents who were married on January 1. Marital status of married arises after the conclusion of a marriage or entering into a registered partnership. Married persons also include persons who are legally separated, because they remain formally married.Population
DivorcedThe number of residents that are divorced on January 1st. Divorce in marital status arises after the dissolution of a marriage by divorce or after dissolution of a registered partnership other than the death of the partner. Persons who are separated from table and bed but formally still maried or partners are considered married.Population
WidowedThe number of residents widowed on January 1. Widowed marital status arises after the dissolution of a marriage or registered partnership due to the death of the partner.Population
Native DutchNative Dutch residents are the 'indigenous' population, in contrast to an immigrant (resident with a migration background) who permanently reside outside the country of birth or that of recent ancestors. The total number of inhabitants minus the number of inhabitants with a migration background. Definition of a person with a migration background: A person with at least one parent that was born abroad. Person with a first-generation migration background: Person who was born abroad with at least one parent born abroad. Person with a second-generation migration background: Person who was born in the Netherlands with at least one parent born abroad.Migration
Western totalTotal number of people with a Western migration background. These are residents whose origin group is one of the countries in the continents of Europe (excluding Turkey), North America and Oceania or Indonesia or Japan. On the basis of their socio-economic and socio-cultural position, immigrants from Indonesia and Japan are classified as western immigrants. This mainly concerns people who were born in the former Dutch East Indies and employees of Japanese companies with their families.Migration
Not western totalTotal number of people with a non-Western migration background. These are immigrants whose origin group is one of the countries in the continents Africa, Latin America and Asia (excluding Indonesia and Japan) or Turkey.Migration
MarcoccoNumber of inhabitants with a Moroccan migration background.Migration
Dutch AntillesNumber of inhabitants with a migration background from the (former) Netherlands Antilles or Aruba. This is an aggregation of the islands that belonged to the territory of the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba from before October 10, 2010. This concerns the islands of Bonaire, Curaçao, Saba, Sint-Eustatius, Sint-Maarten and Aruba.Migration
SurinamNumber of inhabitants with a Surinamese migration background.Migration
TurkeyNumber of inhabitants with a Turkish migration background.Migration
Other not westernNumber of inhabitants with a non-Western background. This is equal to the total number of non-Western minus Morocco, (former) Netherlands Antilles and Aruba, Suriname and Turkey.Migration
BirthsBirths total. The number of live births from January 1 to December 31 of the relevant year. Live births are children who have shown some sign of life after birth, regardless of gestational age.Population
Births relativeThe number of live births from January 1 to December 31, per 1000 inhabitants on January 1 of the relevant year. The relative number of births may be higher than expected based on the population. The relative figure concerns the number of births during the year compared to the number of inhabitants on 1 January. In new housing estates, the number of inhabitants can grow strongly in a year. For example, 10 children can be born in 1 year in a neighborhood where only 10 residents live on January 1, but 200 residents at the end of the year, for example.Population
MortalityMortality total. All deceased from January 1 to December 31 of the year in question where a licensed physician has signed a death certificate.Population
Mortality relativeThe number of deaths from January 1 to December 31, per 1000 inhabitants on January 1 of the relevant year. The relative number of deaths may be higher than expected based on the population. The relative figure concerns the number of deaths during the year compared to the number of inhabitants on 1 January. A neighborhood with a nursing home can accommodate 100 people on 1 January, but deaths mean that new residents are constantly arriving (residents of the nursing home). For example, the number of deaths can also be 100, while many people have already lived in that neighborhood (or that nursing home).Population
HouseholdsThe total number of private households. Private households consist of one or more persons who live alone or together in a living space and who themselves provide for their daily maintenance. In addition to single households, we distinguish multi-person households (unmarried couples, unmarried couples with children, married couples, married couples with children, single-parent households and other households). Institutional households are not included in this.Households
Households 1 personNumber of single person households. A private household consisting of one person.Households
Households no childrenNumber of households without children. Multi-person households without children consist of unmarried couples without children, married couples without children and other households.Households
Households with childrenNumber of households with children. Multi-person households with children consist of unmarried couples with children, married couples with children and single-parent households.Households
Households average sizeAverage household size. This average is calculated as the number of persons living in private households divided by the number of private households.Households
Population densityNumber of inhabitants per square kilometer (km2). The (unrounded) number of inhabitants per km² of land is determined by dividing the (unrounded) number of inhabitants on 1 January by the (unrounded) land area. The population density is included if there are 10 or more inhabitants in the neighborhood.Regional
Number of housesThe total number of homes on January 1 of the year in question. A home is a residential object with at least one residential function and possibly one or more other uses.Houses
Average house valueAverage house value. The average value of real estate of residential objects based on the Real Estate Valuation Act (WOZ value). For the determination of the average home value, only those WOZ objects described as homes serving as main residence (WOZ object code 10) and homes with practical space (WOZ object code 11) with a value greater than zero euros are used. The (provisional) average house value is determined using the value reference date of the previous year, for example 2018: value reference date 1 January 2017. If the housing stock is less than 20 homes or the number of WOZ objects is less than 50, no WOZ value is included.Houses
Percentage single-family housesPercentage single-family homes. The number of single-family homes is stated as a percentage of the total housing stock and is only stated if there are at least 20 homes in a region.Houses
Percentage multi-family houses Percentage of multi-family dwellings. A house is defined as "multi-family" when it forms a whole building together with other houses or (business) spaces. This includes flats, gallery houses, ground floor and upstairs apartments, and apartments and houses above business premises. All other homes are defined as the "single-family" type. Houses
Percentage inhabitedA house is occupied if, according to the Personal Records Database, at least 1 person was registered at the corresponding address. All other homes, that are suitable to be lived in, are considered uninhabited.Houses
Percentage homes uninhabitedHomes uninhabited.Houses
Percentage homes private ownedDwellings owner-occupied. Houses by ownership: Privately owned houses are owned by the resident (s) or used as a second home. Rental houses are not occupied by the owner of the house. Rental homes are divided into (1) homes owned by a housing association or other institution. And (2) rental properties owned by companies, individuals and investors.Houses
Percentage homes rentedPercentage of rental properties in total. Homes that are not occupied by the owner of the home. For homes where no resident is registered, these are homes for which it is likely that the home is intended for the rental market. The number is stated as a percentage of the total number of homes and stated at 20 homes or more per neighborhood and when the share of homes with unknown ownership was 50 percent or less.Houses
Percentage rental-housing by a corporationHouses owned by a rental-corportation. Rental housing owned by 'authorized public housing institutions'. This concerns the number of rental properties for which it has been established that the owner is an authorized institution. It does not concern the number of social rental homes, because it is only established who the owner is and the amount of the rent has not been considered. Authorized institutions: housing association, housing association, housing corporation. Social rental housing: housing with a rent below the liberalization limit.Houses
Percentage homes other rentalPercentage owned by other landlords. A rental home owned by companies, private individuals and institutional investors. Rental properties of which the ownership could be established but the owner is not also included. Companies: all institutions with a commercial character such as private limited companies and private limited companies, independent entrepreneurs, brokers and real estate trading companies. Private individuals: all natural persons. Institutional investors: pension funds, stock exchange, investment and insurance companies.Houses
Homes ownership unknownHomes ownership unknown.Houses
Percentage homes built before 2000Homes built before 2000. The year of construction is the year in which a building containing a home was originally delivered. The construction period as used here has two possible values: (1) built in or after the year 2000 and (2) built before the year 2000.Houses
Percentage homes built since 2000Percentage homes built since 2000.Houses
Average electricity usage totalAverage electricity consumption total in kWh. The average electricity consumption for all housing types together. The average annual consumption of electricity on individual connections of private homes, calculated from data from the connection registers of the energy network companies. Collective consumption of, for example, elevator installations or hall / gallery lighting is not included. Consumption does not include electricity that may be generated in the private homes themselves, for example by solar panels. The figures are rounded to the nearest fifty and are stated for 6 or more (inhabited) dwellings per dwelling type or type of ownership (rental or owner-occupied home).Energy
Average electricity usage appartmentAverage total electricity consumption in kWh by type of dwelling for apartments. The following types are distinguished: apartment, terraced house, corner house, semi-detached house and detached house. The classification is determined by the Land Registry. Apartment: A set of rooms belonging together as separate living accommodation within a larger house, whereby the division of the building has taken place according to apartment law.Energy
Average electricity usage terraced homesAverage electricity usage terraced homesEnergy
Average electricity usage corner homesAverage electricity usage corner homesEnergy
Average electricity usage 2 under 1 roof homesAverage electricity usage 2 under 1 roof homesEnergy
Average electricity usage detached homesAverage electricity usage detached homesEnergy
Average electricity usage rental homesAverage total electricity consumption in kWh by ownership for rental houses.Energy
Average electricity owner-occupied homesAverage electricity consumption in kWh by ownership for owner-occupied homesEnergy
Average natural gas usage totalAverage natural gas usage total. The average annual consumption of natural gas for private homes calculated from data from the connection registers of the energy network companies. The calculation includes homes that are connected to district heating. These homes have a very low or even zero consumption for natural gas. As a result, in areas where district heating is present, the average natural gas consumption of homes is lower than in areas without district heating. The figures are rounded to the nearest fifty and are stated for 6 or more (inhabited) dwellings per dwelling type or type of ownership (rental or owner-occupied home).Energy
Average natural gas usage appartmentAverage natural gas consumption total in m3 by type of dwelling for apartments.Energy
Average natural gas usage terraced homesAverage natural gas consumption total in m3 by type of dwelling for terraced homes.Energy
Average natural gas usage corner homesAverage natural gas consumption total in m3 by type of dwelling for corner homes.Energy
Average natural gas usage 2 under 1 roof homesAverage natural gas consumption total in m3 by type of dwelling for 2 under 1 roof homes.Energy
Average natural gas usage detached homesAverage natural gas consumption total in m3 by type of dwelling for detached homes.Energy
Average natural gas usage rental homesAverage natural gas consumption total in m3 by ownership for rental properties.Energy
Average natural gas owner-occupied homesAverage natural gas consumption total in m3 by ownership for owner-occupied homes.Energy
Percentage homes with district heatingThe percentage of homes that are connected to heat distribution (district heating). Heat distribution is a heating system in which the houses in a neighborhood are heated via an underground network of hot water pipes. In many cases, heat distribution uses residual heat from, for example, power plants. The natural gas consumption of these homes is in many cases very low or even zero. The amount of heat that is consumed from heat distribution by connected homes in a year is not available. The percentage is stated for 10 or more (occupied) houses.Energy
Number of income receiversNumber of income recipients: number of persons with personal income in private households. The figures have been rounded to hundreds. Information on the personal income of persons in private households with known income and the income of private households with known income. The data comes from the Regional Income Survey (RIO) of the previous year. The Regional Income Survey of Statistics Netherlands is mainly based on registers from the Ministry of Finance (the tax registers) and the population registers of the Dutch municipalities (Basic Registration of Persons). The Municipal Personal Records Database is a register in which all residents of a municipality should be registered. The following are excluded: - residents of the Netherlands who make use of exception rules that apply with regard to inclusion in the population registers (non-Dutch diplomats and non-Dutch NATO military personnel). They can decide for themselves whether they are registered in the population registers or not. - asylum seekers who stay in central reception for less than six months and have not yet obtained a residence permit. Income of individuals: The target population consists of individuals in private households. The income data is based on personal income. This includes the following components of a person's gross income: - employment income; - income from own company; - income insurance benefits; - social security benefit (with the exception of child benefit).Income
Average income per income receipientAverage income per income recipient. The arithmetic average personal income per person based on persons with personal income who live in private households. The value is stated for a minimum of 100 persons with personal income in private households per region.Income
Average income per inhabitantAverage income per inhabitant. The arithmetic average personal income per person based on the total population in private households. The value is stated for a minimum of 100 persons in private households per region.Income
40 percentile persons with lowest income40% persons with the lowest income. Share of persons in private households belonging to the 40% nationwide with the lowest personal income. Persons with personal income in private households are classified according to the level of their personal income. The classification takes place after all persons have been nationally ranked from low to high personal income. The 40 percent of persons with the lowest personal income are considered to be among the lowest 40 percent group. Personal income includes income from work, income from own business, income insurance benefits and social security benefits (with the exception of child benefit). The percentage is stated for a minimum of 100 persons with personal income in private households per region.Income
20 percentile persons with highest income20% persons with the highest income. Share of people in private households belonging to the 20% nationwide with highest personal income. The twenty percent of persons with the highest personal income are considered to be in the highest 20 percent group.Income
Active persons 15-75 yearPercentage of active people aged 15 to 75 in terms of income. The share of persons aged 15 to 75 in private households whose main personal source of income is income from work or income from own business, expressed as a whole percentage of the total number of persons aged 15 to 75 in private households. The percentage is stated for a minimum of 100 persons aged 15 to 75 in private households.Income
40 percentile households with lowest income40 percentile households with lowest income.Income
20 percentile households with highest income20 percentile households with highest income.Income
Percentage households with a low incomeHouseholds with a low income. A number of groups of private households have not been included in the determination of low income. This concerns on the one hand student households and on the other hand households with an incomplete annual income. The target population therefore consists of private households of which the main breadwinner (or possible partner) has income throughout the year and is not dependent on student finance. To determine whether a household has a low income, the income of a household is converted into the standardized income (excluding any housing benefit received). Subsequently, this standardized income (with the price index figure) is converted to the price level in 2000. The resulting standardized and deflated income is low when it is less than 9249 Euro. This limit roughly corresponds to the purchasing power of social assistance benefits for a single person in 1979 when it was at its highest. The percentage is stated for at least 100 private households belonging to the target population per region.Income
Percentage households at social minimumPercentage of households below or around the social minimum. In determining the social minimum, a number of groups of private households were not included. This concerns on the one hand student households and on the other hand households with an incomplete annual income. The target population therefore consists of private households of which the main breadwinner (or possible partner) has income throughout the year and is not dependent on student finance. The social minimum is the legal subsistence minimum as determined in political decision-making. In order to be able to assess how the income compares to the minimum, the regulations have determined which standard applies to the relevant household. For example, the standard for a couple with only minor children is equated with the social assistance benefit of a married couple, supplemented by the (age-dependent) child benefit. For people over 65, the amount of AOW pension has been chosen as the standard. The perceived income of households that rely exclusively on social assistance benefits, in many cases deviates slightly from the established standard amounts. If the standard amounts were used as the income threshold, then some of these households would have their income just above the social minimum. That is why not 100%, but 101% of the social minimum is used as the income limit. The percentage is stated for at least 100 private households belonging to the target population per region. Income
Persons with social security welfareNumber of persons that have received social assistance benefits. Social security: Information per municipality, borough and neighborhood about the number of people receiving benefits on the grounds of incapacity for work, social assistance benefits, unemployment and AOW (general old age law).Income
Persons with social security for incapacity for workPersons with social security for incapacity for work.Income
Persons with social security for unemployedPersons with social security for unemployment.Income
Persons with social security for elderlyPersons with social security for elderly.Income
Crime total theft house and barnCrime total theft from house and barn. Figures on crimes are registered by the police, per type of crime expressed in numbers per 1000 inhabitants. The figures are broken down by municipality, borough and neighborhood. Crimes for which the placement location cannot be attributed to a neighborhood are not included.Population
Crime vandalismDestruction and crime against public order per 1000 inhabitants.Population
Crime violance and sexual abuseCrime violance and sexual abuse per 1000 inhabitants.Population
Businesses totalNumber of business locations by activity on 1 January (SBI 2008), excluding business locations in the government, education and healthcare sectors. Data on the number of establishments of companies by economic activity, based on the Standard Business Classification 2008 (SIC 2008). SIC 2008 is the Dutch hierarchical classification of economic activities that is used by Statistics Netherlands to classify business units according to their main activity. The SBI 2008 is the version used from 2008 onwards. The main activity (SBI) of the site is used in this data. Not every branch of a company deals with the main activity (SBI) of the company as a whole. The main activity (SBI) of the site was used to know which activities are carried out in a region. In data, the locations (in addition to the totals) are also subdivided into the following seven sectors: A Agriculture, forestry and fishing BF Industry and energy G + I Trade and catering H + J Transport, information and communication KL Financial services, real estate MN Business RU services Culture, recreation, other services The government, education and healthcare sectors are not included due to the unreliability of these data. The number of branches has been rounded off to a multiple of five. In the case of rounding off, it is possible that the totals do not exactly correspond to the sum of the added numbers. In case the district or neighborhood of the company is unknown, this company is only counted at municipal level. The subdivision by sectors is only stated for 20 or more companies per neighborhood.Business
Businesses agricultural forestry fishingNumber of business establishments with agriculture, forestry and fishing as the main activity.Business
Businesses industry energyNumber of business locations with Industry and energy as main activity.Business
Businesses trade cateringNumber of business establishments with trade and HORECA (Hotel Restaurant Bar) (catering) as main activity.Business
Businesses traffic information communicationsNumber of business locations with Transport, information and communication as the main activity.Business
Businesses financial service real estateNumber of business establishments with financial services, real estate as the main activity.Business
Businesses business servicesNumber of business establishments with business services as the main activity.Business
Businesses culture recreation other servicesNumber of business establishments with Culture, recreation, other services as the main activity.Business
Passenger cars totalTotal number of passenger cars. All reported motor vehicles are passenger cars, commercial vehicles and two-wheelers as registered on January 1st. Trailers and semi-trailers are not included. The data is taken from the Motor Vehicle Statistics. These data are based on the license plate registration of the National Road Transport Agency (RDW). With the help of this registration, counts have been made of all vehicles with current license plates subject to ownership requirements that appear in the license plate file on 1 January. The number of registered motor vehicles includes vehicles from lease and rental companies. These motor vehicles are registered at the address of the lease or rental company. The motor vehicles registered at PO Box addresses are not included in the numbers of the districts and neighborhoods, but they are included in the municipal totals. The districts and neighborhoods therefore do not always add up to municipalities. The municipal totals correspond with the Regional Key Figures Netherlands. Passenger car: Motor vehicle for passenger transport by road, excluding mopeds and motorcycles, with a maximum of nine seats (including the driver's seat). This includes passenger cars, vans designed for and mainly used for the transportation of travelers, taxis, rental cars, ambulances and campers. Light road vehicles for goods transport by road, coaches, buses and minibuses are not covered. The term passenger car also includes taxis and rental cars with less than ten seats. From 1 May 2009, campers are known as passenger cars or as buses, depending on the number of seats. Before that date, campers are registered as special vehicles.Transport
Passenger cars petrolPassenger cars driving at petrol.Transport
Passenger cars other fuelPassenger cars other fuel.Transport
Passenger cars per householdPassenger cars per household. The passenger cars are classified regionally with the aid of the license plate registration. Passenger cars registered at the address of the leasing or rental company therefore distort the car density per household. The number of passenger cars per household is stated for a minimum of 50 households and a value of a maximum of 2.5 passenger cars per household.Transport
Passenger cars per surfaceNumber of passenger cars by surface area per km2.Regional
MotorcyclesNumber of motorcycles. Vehicle for road traffic on two, three or four wheels with an unloaded weight of up to 400 kg. Such motor vehicles with a cylinder capacity of more than 50 cm³ are included, as well as motor vehicles with a cylinder capacity of less than 50 cm³ which do not meet the definition of moped.Transport
Distance to general practicionerDistance to general practicioner. Proximity statistics to amenities: Location that can be visited by persons. The location is in line with the use in daily life. The distance to a facility is calculated on paved roads to be used by cars, not on bicycle and pedestrian paths. Ferry crossings are included. One-way traffic and other entry bans for access roads to national or provincial roads are not taken into account. The average distance of all residents in an area from the nearest GP practice, calculated by road. The average distance is taken when the exact location (x, y coordinate) of the address could be determined for 90 percent or more of the residents in the vicinity. In addition, the average is only stated for a minimum of 10 residents per neighborhood.Proximity
Distance to big supermarketDistance to big supermarket.Proximity
Distance to child careDistance to child care.Proximity
Distance to schoolDistance to school.Proximity
Schools within 3 kmSchools within 3 km.Proximity
Surface totalSurface total. The total area as the sum of the areas of water and land in whole hectares (ha.). For the determination of area figures, the digital municipal boundaries file of the Land Registry was used.Regional
Surface landSurface land. Number of area of land in whole hectares (ha.).Regional
Surface waterSurface water. Number of surface water in whole hectares (ha.). Surface water includes both indoor and outdoor water. Inland water includes all water not subject to tides and wider than 6 meters, such as the IJsselmeer, Markermeer, Randmeren, ditches, rivers, canals and the like. Under the open water, all water is subject to tides, such as the Wadden Sea, Oosterschelde, Westerschelde and the municipal division of the North Sea. The surface water is determined by combining the most recent digital file Land use with the digital file of municipal, borough and neighborhood boundaries. The outside water is only stated at municipal level, water per district or neighborhood only consists of inland water. The surface water is expressed in whole hectares (ha.).Regional
Zipcode most occuringMost common numerical zip code in a neighborhood, based on the number of addresses in the Geographic Basic Register (GBR, definitive version) as of 1 January.Regional
Measure of urbanityCode for the degree of urbanity. Based on the surrounding address density, each neighborhood, borough or municipality has been assigned an urbanity class. The following classification has been used: 1: very urban> = 2 500 addresses per km² 2: highly urban 1 500 - 2 500 addresses per km² 3: moderately urban 1 000 - 1 500 addresses per km² 4: few urban 500 - 1 000 addresses per km² 5: non-urban <500 addresses per km²Regional
Address densityAddress densityRegional
Explanation of the table:

Background information about the table, table usage, open data sources used, regional divisions in the Netherlands and more:

Table usage:

  • Click on the links for each region name and view the separate page with information for that region.
  • Search the table by filtering the rows with the search field at the top right of the table.
  • Sort the table by clicking on the column titles.

Data providers

Many of the topics come from the core statistics about boroughs and neighbourhoods by the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS). In addition, various other sources have been used. E.g. the address data and some of the data about dwellings is taken from the “BAG” (the Key Register of Addresses and Buildings by the Dutch Land Registry, the Kadaster). See the overview of all sources used.

Key figures for municipalities, boroughs and neighbourhoods

A lot of regional information on various themes is presented at AllCharts.info. Such as population, for example the age groups distribution, family composition, gender, native Dutch or Dutch with an immigration background, …, environment: land use, distance to amenities, homes (numbers, types, price development, use, type of property, … ), economy (income of the inhabitants, number of business establishments by type) and various other themes such as car ownership and energy consumption.

Several times a year, the key figure survey provides new figures on demographic and socio-economic topics, broken down by municipalities, boroughs and neighbourhoods. As a result, some information at AllCharts is from the past year while other parts may be a year older. The information about boroughs and neighbourhood is very broad. The subjects are: population, housing, energy, education, labor, income, social security, companies, motor vehicles, facilities, surface area and land use.

The municipalities are divided into boroughs and neighbourhoods. Each municipality has at least one borough and each borough is made up of at least one neighborhood.

The figures per municipality are used to determine the data for the Netherlands and per province.

View all pages with regional figures for The Netherlands!

Who determines the division into boroughs and neighbourhoods?

The municipalities in the Netherlands have determined their subdivision into boroughs and neighbourhoods themselves. The CBS coordinates this classification nationally. Sometimes a borough is defined as a district (such as Riel, Riel is a village in the municipality of Goirle and is listed as borough at AlleCharts.info). Sometimes a village is defined as a neighborhood (such as the village of Oosterend in the municipality of Texel, see this page at neighborhood level).

Neighborhoods are the lowest regional level. Neighborhoods are sums of one or more contiguous boroughs. A borough is often part of the municipality where a certain form of land use or buildings predominates. For example: industrial area, residential area with high-rise or low-rise. A neighborhood is often part of the municipality that is homogeneously demarcated from a building point of view or socio-economic structure. Homogeneous means that one function is dominant, for example residential function (residential area), work function (industrial area) or recreational function (nature area). However, functions can also appear mixed.

Sources
Neighbourhoods in The Netherlands with the statistics about the population per neighbourhood.

Neighbourhoods in The Netherlands with the statistics about the population per neighbourhood.